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Summer Olympics Coming Soon!

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Summer Olympics Coming Soon!

We are coming up on the 2012 Summer Games, reflecting back to 2008 we saw there were a high incidence of ankle sprain and thigh injuries. Although these injuries happened to high-level athletes, the general active population is exposed to the same types of injuries through sports such as soccer and hockey. Below are some ways Physical Therapy can help your Weekend Warriors or Olympic Hopefuls get back in their game!

Ankle Sprains

• Acute Care: Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation (RICE) • Recovery, on average, takes about 8 physical therapy visits, depending on severity. • Manual therapy to improve range of motion and decrease any swelling. • Strength exercises to begin to improve overall strength of the lower extremity. • Improve proprioception. The athlete would demonstrate proper ankle control and balance for greater than 30 seconds. The athlete would be progressively challenged with activities in standing. And, the athlete would demonstrate proper control with dynamic hopping and jumping activities. • The athlete would have NO pain or laxity with ankle stress tests. • At therapy completion, we would expect the athlete to demonstrate full ROM and strength. • Athlete can return to play when able to and is cleared by supervising physician.

Thigh Injuries

• Acute Care: Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation (RICE) • Recovery, on average takes about 10 physical therapy visits, depending on severity. • Mild stretching of the hamstrings, quadriceps, achilles, and IT band should be started gently and become more aggressive as pain permits. • Incorporate proprioception activity as pain permits. • Utilize the stationary bike to gently provide range of motion to the injured area. • Begin Progressive Resistance Exercises as pain as motion permit. • Start general and functional activity to improve overall strength. • Return to full activity when bilateral quad strength is equal & athlete is cleared by physician.

Have additional questions or concerns? Contact Physical Therapy is here to help you and your patients. Please contact us at either of our locations.