Common Baseball Injuries and Fun Facts

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baseball injuries

Common Baseball Injuries and Fun Facts

Spring Training is here and we wanted to share some fun facts with you and common baseball injuries to look out for!

common baseball injuriesArizona Baseball Fun Facts

Chicago Cubs

Mesa has been hosting the Cubs since 1952. Previous to Hohokam Park and Fitch Park, the Chicago Cubs Spring Training facility was called Rendezvous Park.

Arizona Diamondbacks

The Diamondbacks have the first Major League Baseball spring training facility in the nation to be built on Native American land.

San Francisco Giants

The original Scottsdale Stadium was built in 1956 and served as the former Cactus League home of the Baltimore Orioles, Boston Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, Oakland A’s and now the San Francisco Giants.


Most Common Baseball Injuries

In Children Eye Injuries are the most common baseball injuries in children, while as many as 45% of pitchers under the age of 12 have chronic elbow pain.

In Teenagers Other than lacerations and bruises, the most common teenage baseball injuries are sprains and strains. However, pitchers suffer the most from overuse injuries. About 58% of high school pitchers suffer from an overuse injury of the elbow or shoulder.

In Professionals Recent studies show the most common baseball injuries among fielders include hamstring & groin strains. While pitchers tend to strain/tear ligaments in the elbow or rotator cuff.


A quote from the Diamondbacks Strength Coach, Nate Shaw!

“From my perspective, the warm up is one of the most important parts of the day. It prepares athletes for a day consisting of reactive movements in every plane. Our goal with the warm up is to have athletes go through a series of planned movements, lubricating the joints and raising the body temperature enough to sweat. A rise in core temperature and preemptive motion in all directional planes are two of the bigger themes for us, especially during spring training.”

To purchase tickets to a Diamondbacks spring training game, visit The Arizona Diamondbacks website.

Are you or your child experiencing one of the above listed conditions? Contact Us today to schedule an injury assessment!

construction injuries

Work Comp Injuries and Facts

work comp injuriesEvaluate Year End Workers Compensation Key Drivers

With the end of 2012 approaching, now is a good time to assess your injury data. Unfortunately for businesses, trends are showing a slow incline in claim frequencies since 2008. Are you taking prevention measures to avoid the most common non-fatal work comp injuries? Pay attention to cost drivers such as severity of injuries, lost time and medical costs.

Examining the cause of the injury and injury rates by shift and position may help uncover possible risks and hazards when dealing with injury control information. Read our list below for the most common non-fatal work injuries and interesting facts from 2011.


MOST COMMON WORK INJURIES & INTERESTING FACTS

  • Most common nature of injury – sprains and strains
  • Most common injury by event or exposure – overexertion
  • Most common injury by body part – back
  • Second most common injury by body part – knee
  • Number of work comp injury claims filed in 2011 – 96,480

FACTORS TO KEEP IN MIND FOR WORK COMP INJURY COSTS:

  • Costs of medical services
  • Utilization (number of treatments per claim)
  • Aging workforce
  • Diagnosis mix
  • Rising prevalence of obesity

 

avoid injury this holiday

How the Holidays are like a Sporting Event

avoid injury this holidayThe Holidays are like a Sporting Event, take these Precautions for a Safe and Happy Season.

Remember to always reflect and appreciate what your Holiday Season is all about, and follow these tips to avoid injury this holiday season.

1. Pre-Shopping (pre-game)

Eat right, drink plenty of water, stretch and exercise.

Stay well hydrated. Try to drink eight to ten 8-ounce glasses of water a day. Stay away from sugary drinks.  On your shopping day (game day) you may want to drink even MORE water to be prepared.

Be sure to stretch before and after a long day of shopping. When you are tired and stressed, your muscles are less flexible than normal.

2. Wear the appropriate gear.

Comfortable clothes and shoes with plenty of cushioning in the soles to absorb the impact of walking long hours on those hard shopping mall floors are recommended.

If you carry a purse, leave it at home. Wear a light backpack instead. Pack only essentials, such as your driver’s license and credit card.

3. Injury timeout.

If you start to feel some pain, take care of it quickly. Apply an ice bag to the affected area for 20 minutes.  Take it off for a couple of hours and repeat a couple of times each day over the next day or two.

4. Time Outs Needed.  Plan Frequent Breaks Into Your Shopping Day

During a long day of shopping, most people should take a break every 45 minutes. Those that may be more deconditioned may need to take more frequent breaks.

5. Get a locker to store your gear.

Use your car as your own personal locker.  Don’t carry around more than is absolutely necessary at one time, this can cause extra strain on your body.

6. Water break.

Take breaks, and try to eat light, healthy and hydrating options. A salad and fruit is a much better option that a burger and fries or pizza.

7. Wrapping Your Gifts (Post-game)

Remember to vary your position when wrapping gifts.  Stand at a counter, then sit at a table.  Avoid wrapping presents while sitting on the floor.

Stretch before and after wrapping gifts.  An important recommendation is to stretch the opposite way you are wrapping.  If you are leaning forward, then stretch backward when you are done.

Keep these things in mind this holiday season – since the holidays are like a sporting event – and stay injury free!

 

preventing pain scottsdale

Ouch…Don’t Slouch!

preventing pain scottsdalePreventing Pain at Work

This article includes Tips for preventing pain while working at your desk.

Some people may think injuries don’t occur with sedentary desk jobs, but, unfortunately that isn’t true. Many times bad posture and an improper work station can contribute to aches and pains such as carpal tunnel syndrome, back pain and neck pain. Below are some tips for avoiding these common complaints and work toward preventing pains.

  • Get up and move at least one time each hour.
  • Take an arm break. Shrug your shoulders, raise your arms, stretch your hands and reach for the ceiling
  • Tighten and relax your abdominal muscles while you are sitting
  • Stretch out your hamstring- the back of your leg
  • Stretch your hip flexors- the muscle in the crease of the front of your hip.
  • Squeeze your shoulder blades together by pulling them down and together.
  • Take deep “belly breaths”.
  • Make sure your workstation allows for you to keep your wrists straight, and not flexed upward, to use your keyboard.
  • Check your chair height and keep your hips in a good position. Bent at 90-120 degrees is acceptable.
  • Keep your monitor at eye level.

An office job in itself can be challenge enough at times, adding pain on top of your busy schedule can make it unbearable! Anyone can start experiencing these aches and pains, but following the suggestions above will help decrease any tension and tightness you might feel from being seated for most of the day. Still have symptoms? Schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider or give Contact Physical Therapy a call at either of our locations.

Contact Physical Therapy Mesa

Hip Flexor Stretches

Do you have a job that requires you to sit all day? It is very important to get up and stretch! Your hip flexors can become very tight from remaining in a sitting position all day. To avoid common aches and pains, be sure to incorporate a hip flexor stretch into your daily routine. In this video Noah Arenson, with Contact Physical Therapy, demonstrates how to complete two simple hip flexor stretches.

Click on the video below to watch the different hip flexor stretches you can do at work!

Contact Physical Therapy Mesa

An office job in itself can be a challenge enough at times, adding pain on top of your busy schedule can make it unbearable! Anyone can start experiencing these aches and pains, but by following the above mentioned hip flexor stretches and suggestions listed in our Our Don’t Slouch Post you will help decrease any tension and tightness you might feel from being seated for most of the day.

Still have symptoms? Schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider or give Contact Physical Therapy a call at either of our locations.

Back School in Mesa

Back School in Mesa

Back School in MesaWe are excited to announce our Back School in Mesa! Read the details below for information on our presenters and event details. If you have back pain or recently had back surgery, register for the Back School and come out to learn from our therapists. We will have a Q&A at the end for any of your questions regarding back pain.

REGISTER NOW


The Back School in Mesa Arizona: Learn how to live free from pain

The Back School in Mesa Arizona is helping patients prevent back pain through stretches, stabilization exercises, posture and more Reserve your spot for our July Session of The Back School!

PRICE: COMPLIMENTARY

July 11, 2012

6:00-7:00pm

4850 E. Baseline Rd., Suite 114

Mesa, AZ 85206

Presenter: Jim Irvin, PT
Jim graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science/Biomechanics from Arizona State University and received his Masters in Physical Therapy from the University of Southern California. He is a Valley native and has been practicing physical therapy in the East Valley since 1995. His specialties include manual therapy, sports medicine and therapeutic exercise. Jim has a strong background in exercise science research and has patented a piece of exercise equipment used for core stabilization and resistance training.
Guest Speaker: Michael McCauley, MD
Dr. McCauley has been practicing pain management in the Valley since 1982. He uses an integrative approach to evaluating and treating his patients and their pain issues. He does a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic spinal injections to diagnose and treat various spine problems, as well as other conditions. He is a firm believer in rehabilitation and encourages patients to always work on integrating this into their daily lives.

Summer Olympics Coming Soon!

Summer Olympics Coming Soon!

We are coming up on the 2012 Summer Games, reflecting back to 2008 we saw there were a high incidence of ankle sprain and thigh injuries. Although these injuries happened to high-level athletes, the general active population is exposed to the same types of injuries through sports such as soccer and hockey. Below are some ways Physical Therapy can help your Weekend Warriors or Olympic Hopefuls get back in their game!

Ankle Sprains

• Acute Care: Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation (RICE) • Recovery, on average, takes about 8 physical therapy visits, depending on severity. • Manual therapy to improve range of motion and decrease any swelling. • Strength exercises to begin to improve overall strength of the lower extremity. • Improve proprioception. The athlete would demonstrate proper ankle control and balance for greater than 30 seconds. The athlete would be progressively challenged with activities in standing. And, the athlete would demonstrate proper control with dynamic hopping and jumping activities. • The athlete would have NO pain or laxity with ankle stress tests. • At therapy completion, we would expect the athlete to demonstrate full ROM and strength. • Athlete can return to play when able to and is cleared by supervising physician.

Thigh Injuries

• Acute Care: Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation (RICE) • Recovery, on average takes about 10 physical therapy visits, depending on severity. • Mild stretching of the hamstrings, quadriceps, achilles, and IT band should be started gently and become more aggressive as pain permits. • Incorporate proprioception activity as pain permits. • Utilize the stationary bike to gently provide range of motion to the injured area. • Begin Progressive Resistance Exercises as pain as motion permit. • Start general and functional activity to improve overall strength. • Return to full activity when bilateral quad strength is equal & athlete is cleared by physician.

Have additional questions or concerns? Contact Physical Therapy is here to help you and your patients. Please contact us at either of our locations.